Sermons

Because the Episcopal Church welcomes many different points of view, the sermons offered during an Episcopal service may vary widely from congregation to congregation. And it's not just the clergy who preach; in many small congregations, lay leaders deliver the sermons more often than not.

To assist these small congregations, the Episcopal Church offers new sermons each week for Sundays and major feast days throughout the year. The idea of supplying congregations with sermons or homilies dates back to the Articles of Religion, which were established during the English Reformation in the sixteenth century. Article 35, “Of the Homilies,” lists 21 homilies that were considered “godly and wholesome” for congregational use (Book of Common Prayer, pp. 874-875).
 
Carrying on that tradition, the Episcopal Church has been offering "Sermons That Work" online since 1995. Browse its archives of over 1,000 sermons, grouped by lectionary years (A, B, C).
 
For Spanish sermons, visit "Sermones que iluminan," with weekly lectionary-based sermons written in Spanish by Latino/Hispanic church leaders specifically for Latino/Hispanic congregations.

 

 

 

 

 

The Five Marks of Mission

The Mission of the Church Is the Mission of Christ

~ To proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom
~ To teach, baptize and nurture new believers 
~ To respond to human need by loving service 
~ To seek to transform unjust structures of society, to challenge violence of every kind and to pursue peace and reconciliation
~ To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth
 
We recognize with gratitude that the Five Marks of Mission, developed by the Anglican Consultative Council between 1984 and 1990, have won wide acceptance among Anglicans, and have given parishes and dioceses around the world a practical and memorable "checklist" for mission activities.

 

LGBT in the Church

In 1976, the General Convention of the Episcopal Church declared that “homosexual persons are children of God who have a full and equal claim with all other persons upon the love, acceptance, and pastoral concern and care of the Church" (1976-A069). Since then, faithful Episcopalians have been working toward a greater understanding and radical inclusion of all of God’s children.

Along the way, The Episcopal Church has garnered a lot of attention, but with the help of organizations such as Integrity USA, the church has continued its work toward full inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Episcopalians. In 2003, the first openly gay bishop was consecrated; in 2009, General Convention resolved that God’s call is open to all; and in 2012, a provisional rite of blessing for same-gender relationships was authorized, and discrimination against transgender persons in the ordination process was officially prohibited.

To our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender brothers and sisters: “The Episcopal Church welcomes you!”  

 

As Episcopalians, we are followers of Jesus Christ, our Lord, and we believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
 
The Episcopal Church has members in the United States, as well as in Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Haiti, Honduras, Micronesia, Puerto Rico, Taiwan, Venezuela, and the Virgin Islands.
 
We strive to love our neighbors as ourselves and respect the dignity of every person.
 
The Episcopal Church is part of the worldwide Anglican Communion, and traces its heritage to the beginnings of Christianity.
 
Our liturgy retains ancient structure and traditions and is celebrated in many languages.
 
Both men and women, including those who are married, are eligible for ordination as deacons, priests and bishops.
 
We believe in amendment of life, the forgiveness of sin, and life everlasting.
 
Lay people exercise a vital role in the governance and ministry of our church.
 
Holy Communion may be received by all baptized Christians, not only members of the Episcopal Church.
 
We uphold the Bible and worship with the Book of Common Prayer.
 
We affirm that committed relationships are lifelong and monogamous. Episcopalians also recognize that there is grace after divorce and do not deny the sacraments to those who have been divorced.
 
We affirm that issues such as birth control are matters of personal informed conscience.
 
We celebrate our unity in Christ while honoring our differences, always putting the work of love before uniformity of opinion.
 
All are welcome to find a spiritual home in the Episcopal Church.